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Over the past two weeks, Justin Trudeau has feebly attempted to play the role of a strongman by:

a) imposing reciporical taxes on the U.S. (as a response to their tariffs),
b) by preventing the recent attempted Chinese takeover of Aecon,
c) and by nationalizing the Keystone Pipeline (something suggested by The Red Ensign just two weeks ago).

It is hard to oppose measures like these in and of themselves, however, one should always be careful when Progressive Liberals and Progressive Conservatives try to take on the role of the strongman.

Where Progressives play the strongman on one hand, this is often offset by their sleaziness on the other hand.

Situations like these beg to question why nations reach a position where vital companies are at risk of being taken over in the first place. Harper also prevented the takeover of the Canadian telecommunications company Allstream by the Egyptian company Accelero back in 2013, citing “concerns of national security”, although Allstream was eventually taken over by the U.S. Fibre Optic Provider “Zayo Group” in 2016, by which point Trudeau was in power. While Trudeau allowed Allstream to be sold on one hand while preventing the takeover of Aecon, Harper allowed Tim Hortons and the Bay to be sold off while preventing the takeover of Allstream.

We must not forget that it was under Kathleen Wynne’s Liberal government in Ontario that Hydro One was privatized and sold off as a way to balance the budget at the last minute. While the Liberals hoped to offset the unpopularity of this by introducing government funded child care and by increasing the minimum wage, they have jeopardized a key source of revenue for the Ontario Government in the long term, a source of revenue which ultimately could be used to help fund the very social services and public programs offered by the Liberals.

Now the NDP are left with a position where they will need to expropriate the shares while paying an additional 15% of what those shares were worth in reparations, however, the NDP are prepared to take and give more than the liberals are, which is why they are now much more popular.

Why we don’t expropriate without compensation as a means of taking our land back? I don’t know. At the end of the day, might makes right, and Euro-Canadians appear to have a much weaker disposition than the black majorities in Zimbabwe and South Africa, who aren’t afraid to seize their land for themselves.

If we look at the positive effects of the expropriation of oil companies by the state owned company PEMEX down south in Mexico (under the authoritarian populist Lázaro Cárdenas), these positive effects seem quite apparent in what is dubbed the “Mexican Miracle”, which was characterized by a sustained growth rate of 3-4% from the 1940s to the 1970s.

Mexico wasn’t the only authoritarian country during this time that was experiencing this sort of growth, many “banana republics” in South America and many “Tigers” and “Cubs” in Far-East Asia experienced the same sort of growth. When the Neoliberals at the IMF and World Bank tell you this was because of liberal democracy, it is worth noting that most of these countries experienced their growth under authoritarian regimes that pursued corporatist and protectionist economic policy.

Like Justin, Pierre Elliot Trudeau also tried to take on the role of the strongman in his execution of the War Measures Act against the FLQ and in raising interest rates to combat inflation, however, this was also the man who passed the Multiculturalism Act of 1988, and this was the man who passed the Immigration Acts of 1976 and 1978.

With Justin, we must not forget that this is the man who has racked up an enormous federal deficit. This is the man who wants to open borders, increase mass immigration, and go “post-national”. This is the man whose regime has tried to pass laws like Motion 103 (which prohibits criticism of Islam), Bill 89 (which allows the government to take children away), and Bill C-16 (which introduces mandated speech with “proper pronouns”). This is the man who non-penetrative bestiality has been made legal under by the supreme court. This is the man who wants to lower the age for sodomy. This is the man who tried to get rid of Friday sittings and remove accountability for his actions from Parliamentary dialogue, and it’s not hard to see why.

Perhaps there would be something to say for Justin if his record consisted solely of classics like: “honour killings are not barbaric” and “there’s something to be said for the Chinese style of dictatorship”, but the fact that there are also quotes like “if you kill your enemy, you lose”, makes one think Justin might be “lacking in honour” (if you catch my drift).

For all that is said about Justin being the son of Fidel Castro (and if you read the biographies of authors like Ron Lippert Jones (an ex CIA agent who was stationed in Cuba) and John English (Pierre’s personal biographer) this seems quite plausible), it would actually be something if he was some tanked-out Shi’i’te Leninist or Dengist in line with the Ba’ath movement. This is true to the same extent that Obama would actually seem kind of badass if it turned out he was a Radical Sunni and a communist covert operative (ultimately a Gadaffi or Sankara type), but alas, both Trudeau and Obama are ultimately weaklings with no strong convictions. Perhaps there’s a little bit of Karl Popper here (thanks to Neoliberals like good ol’ George Soros), and a little bit of Saul Alinksky there (mixed with the Trotskyist Zionism of Neoconservatism), but these people are ultimately puppets to the Post-Modern and Cultural-Marxist leanings that prop up much of the population.

What else can we expect from Trudeau aside from him trying to redeem his image and cover up his tracks? If the Ontario provincial election is a microcosm of the Federal Election to come, it has shown that the Progressive Liberal regime of Justin has died even quicker than the Progressive Conservative dynasty of Harper. Even if the Liberals were to win, it seems likely they’d probably just eventually re-privatize the pipeline somewhere down the road anyways, and I can’t say I would expect any less of the Conservatives.

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Author

Maurice Porter

Located in Ontario, Canada, Maurice Porter is a journalist who focuses on history and current affairs from a nationalist perspective. Having attended university in Waterloo, Porter studied history, politics, and philosophy from a Western perspective. Maurice manages the MacDonald Institute and wrote the MacDonald Mandate, which is currently being used by the Canadian Nationalist Party.