Canada needs a Populist alternative to the Progressive Conservatives, lest the side of excessive social progress upheave our political institutions and turn our culture into a war of social justice warriors seeking to claim the throne of political correctness. Canada needs an outlet to address the Populist sentiments of the labour left and the white working class majority, while also maintaining the social conservatism and traditional culture of the past millennium— traditional culture that was characterized by monocultural homogeneity and monogamous heterosexuality.

I am convinced the only way any kind of Nationalist movement will get ahead is through the merger of Labour-Left style Socialist-Populism with Populist-Right style Economic Nationalism. Candidates like Sanders (who at one point advocated against mass immigration) and Corbyn (who stands against Israel and who favours Nationalization) need to merge with leaders like Orban (who advocates for economic nationalism and social conservatism) and Trump (who advocates for economic and civic nationalism). In terms of Canadian politics, this would look like a NDP-Conservative coalition, or it would look like a Nationalist option that facilitates this political demand.

At this point, Canada cannot even boast of having great private works let alone great public works, and perhaps our reliance on private entities over the nation state is responsible for this. The Hudson’s Bay company was sold to NRDC Equity Partners in the U.S., Tim Hortons was sold to Burger King, and Hydro One has been privatized.

When engaging in policy analysis of countries like Hungary, we must look at what can be learned from them. Hungary and Poland both have defended themselves against terrorist attacks, they have successfully reduced the numbers and risk associated with the “refugee” crisis, they seem to be experiencing a high level of GDP growth with high scores on the HDI, and they are coming together on the grounds of mutual national strength.

On February 28th of this year, Stephen Harper gave a speech at the Standford Graduate School of Business on the rise of populism and nationalism in the West, claiming that he believed Canada was not “immune” to such “polarization”. Interestingly enough, this speech, while implicitly referring to populist nationalism as a divisive disease, made some rather unusual concessions for a “progressive conservative”.