Soros thrives off of creating unity in revolutionary conflict and funding terror by manipulating the excessively competitive and speculative nature of open markets. His ultimate goal is a society with elections open to anyone, no borders, markets open to anyone (no barriers to entry), and free speech permitted for anyone to say anything except those who would say things that censor others.

At this point, Canada cannot even boast of having great private works let alone great public works, and perhaps our reliance on private entities over the nation state is responsible for this. The Hudson’s Bay company was sold to NRDC Equity Partners in the U.S., Tim Hortons was sold to Burger King, and Hydro One has been privatized.

When engaging in policy analysis of countries like Hungary, we must look at what can be learned from them. Hungary and Poland both have defended themselves against terrorist attacks, they have successfully reduced the numbers and risk associated with the “refugee” crisis, they seem to be experiencing a high level of GDP growth with high scores on the HDI, and they are coming together on the grounds of mutual national strength.

It seems as though Trump has been rather merciful with Canada as well as Mexico when it comes to his tariffs on steel and aluminum, but we are at our “final one month break” in the hands of an American national empire that is currently in the process of getting itself into gear and increasing its own total productive forces. Do we subsist with our attempts to ensure better trade conditions for ourselves and are we to become subservient to U.S. interests?

The Indian Act is a controversial measure, and with the recent Keystone pipeline development in motion, this controversy has only been heightened. The Indian Act has its pros and cons for both Natives and Canadian citizens alike. On one hand, Canadian Citizens are burdened with money given to natives as reparations in addition to having to give up the territory which we were able to establish our institutions on, on the other hand, natives are limited within territory which they feel is rightfully theirs and they are subject to expanding industrial projects which encroach on what territory they have.

On February 28th of this year, Stephen Harper gave a speech at the Standford Graduate School of Business on the rise of populism and nationalism in the West, claiming that he believed Canada was not “immune” to such “polarization”. Interestingly enough, this speech, while implicitly referring to populist nationalism as a divisive disease, made some rather unusual concessions for a “progressive conservative”.